Directed by Words: How Entrepreneurs Rely on Salient Frames to Devise a Market Entry Strategy

Language is powerful; scholars have shown that organizations rely on language to guide stakeholder interpretations to create value for the focal firm. For example, entrepreneurial firms can use language to access resources and to generate other support from stakeholders. But language also has the power to direct the actions of firms. Shon Hiatt and W. … More Directed by Words: How Entrepreneurs Rely on Salient Frames to Devise a Market Entry Strategy

A STRATEGY CONTRIBUTION TO THE IMMIGRATION DEBATE

Do skilled ethnic migrants steal jobs from local skilled workers? According to Prithwiraj (Raj) Choudhury and Do Yoon Kim, this question may originate from a flawed assumption—that domestic and foreign workers carry equal skills, and are essentially interchangeable. Yet, evidence from their recently accepted SMJ paper reveals that foreign and domestic workers differ in the … More A STRATEGY CONTRIBUTION TO THE IMMIGRATION DEBATE

Just how stigmatized are dismissed CEOs?

Stigma is a strange thing—the very attributes that can result in stigma for some, may not be nearly as damaging to others. A new study entitled “How stigmatized are dismissed chief executives? The role of character questioning causal accounts and executive capital in dismissed CEO re‐employment” by Donald J. Schepker and Vincent L. Barker III … More Just how stigmatized are dismissed CEOs?

Reflections on Hannah and Eisenhardt’s “How Firms Navigate Cooperation and Competition in Nascent Ecosystems”: Exploring Bottlenecks as a Central Concept in Innovation Ecosystem Theory

Industries in an early phase of emergence are steeped with uncertainty. When this is combined with a complex, novel technology, managers face a deeply challenging environment in which to strategize. In an article forthcoming in the Strategic Management Journal, Douglas Hannah and Kathleen Eisenhardt explore the strategies managers used in the emerging US residential solar industry. … More Reflections on Hannah and Eisenhardt’s “How Firms Navigate Cooperation and Competition in Nascent Ecosystems”: Exploring Bottlenecks as a Central Concept in Innovation Ecosystem Theory